Archives for August 2020

MICA Review. Is Maximum Income Capital Automation a Scam?

Some of the most questionable make money online opportunities I run into typically carry common warning signs and in MICA’s case, it sadly has all the major ones I would warn people about (I’ll tell you them below).

I found this program today while browsing through an old known scam site that is known to promote these types of programs. In rare instances, these sites will promote a good program. However, in my opinion, MICA is not that rare case. Let’s dive into this review and allow me to explain the issues I see with it (and what I recommend that is truly safer to try).

The quick review of MICA (Maximum Income Capital Automation):

Maximum Income Capital Automation review

Creator: Unknown (it’s a guy with a nice looking beard, but that doesn’t make me trust him).

Price: $97

What is it? So supposedly MICA gives you a fully automated eCommerce website and then drives traffic to that website so it makes money. In other words, by the way they make it sound, all you need to do is buy the program and poof, your site is ready and your money is waiting to come in.

But of course, I will debunk this absurdity in this review because I have had experiences with programs like this.

Overall Rating: 0 out of 10 stars

Recommended? Absolutely not!

This program not only has major red flags, but also leads me to believe that once you buy it, in my opinion, you may likely have to spend more money on traffic, and “business coaches” and I know how that works and what it really is (more money costs to you).

Overall, nothing this program pitched made me trust it.

Alternatives:

mica alternative

3 honest disclaimers about this review of MICA:

1) I didn’t buy this “magic money making” program and that’s because I know better from past (bad) experiences. I’ll highlight some of them in this post.

2) I know the truth about making a truly profitable website (it’s explained below) and I can assure you that, pressing a few buttons, have a website that sells products pop up isn’t enough. In fact, even if they give you traffic to send to that site, that presents it’s own plethora of problems if you don’t understand how traffic works and what sells.

In short, they simplify the process to get you to buy the program, and I assure you, the process is more complicated than that.

3) I strongly suspect they are trying to get you to buy the program so they can then upsell you things like coaching/mentor calls.

In the sales page, they talk about getting a “business coach” when you buy the program but I am 100% certain that the “consultation” you get is really a pitch to buy more. These kinds of programs in my experience are very notorious for that.

A shocking story about a scam program I ran into that is eerily similar to MICA:

About a year ago, I purchased a program called Website ATM. At the time, I knew better and purchased it because I had a 1% ounce of doubt that I could be wrong.

That program’s sales page whipped out all the crazy, inflated promises you see with MICA. Things like:

  • Just buy our program, and get a profitable site instantly.
  • We get you traffic so it’ll make money within 24 hours.
  • You can be making a full time income instantly.
  • Don’t worry about the details, we “handle it for you”.
  • Testimonials from people who said they got results.

And if you compare these promises to MICA, you’ll find nearly identical similarities.

So what happened after I bought it?

  • I discovered I got a truly garbage eCommerce website.
  • I didn’t get any traffic to the site unless I purchased far higher upsells.
  • I believe I was also pitched some garbage coaching offers.
  • In short, I got a website that did nothing and probably wouldn’t even if I fixed it myself.

And Website ATM’s case is not isolated. I’ve tested and bought many work at home scam programs before, and after realizing how often I’m right and shouldn’t let that ounce of doubt let me lose money, I know better now.

And this is the kind of thing I expect from MICA. Here’s 4 reasons why:

1) They literally admit that their testimonials are fake:

Maximum Income Capital Automation fake testimonialsI gotta give the Maximum Income Capital Automation program credit here.

I’ve never seen any program flat out come out and just admit this, and literally right at the start of the sales page of all timings.

Never the less, how can you trust a program who literally buys actors to do their testimonials?

They try to make what I consider an excuse for this saying they protect privacy, but I call nonsense on this because legitimate programs that operate legitimately, will have willing customers give out testimonials because they are happy.

If you take the program I am recommend like Wealthy Affiliate, their success stories and testimonials (see Wealthy Affiliate success stories) which you can see at that link are real.

Hiding identities is not necessary when you’re operating legitimately in my honest opinion, period.

2) Let’s talk about the whole sales pitch and how ridiculous it is.

So again, they pitch this idea that their program has some crazy new system that easily makes people money if they simply buy the program. Like I said before, you get a website with products to sell and they send you traffic so you make money. Sounds amazing right? Well if you have 0 experience with websites and how it really works, maybe.

But in reality, this is such a disingenuous way of selling that it disgusts me. A profitable website is made this way yes, but there are tons of details in the mix of this formula to actually make it work.

This is explained on my homepage here, but also in the way that the alternative, Wealthy Affiliate program teaches you how to do things. And it takes work. It’s not a push button system, sorry, but it is profitable.

3) The never actually explain the system and that’s a red flag.

Again, the selling points of this program are:

  • Buy the program and you’ll make money fast (that’s my personal takeaway).
  • Look at all the fake testimonials that say this works.

4) The whole program title “Maximum Income Capital Automation” is just theater in my opinion.

Again, it’s explained vaguely (but I could understand what’s up because of my experience with this stuff) and they dress up that vagueness up by saying it’s some super titled system (MICA),

Whenever any program doesn’t give you the right details and realistic expectations on how it works, run and MICA does all the things that would make me do that.

how a real website is made

Final Rating: Maximum Income Capital Automation (MICA)

0 stars

Red Flag

0 out of 10 stars. This program does one thing very well and that is: Sells itself on hype alone.

But it doesn’t take a lot of research and questions to make that hype fall apart. I just know how these programs work and how a truly profitable site is truly made so I can quickly find the holes in this system and warn people about it.

My final thoughts:

Since I started doing online marketing, sites like MICA have been around and all of them pretty much say the same things and claim the same things.

But having fallen for them more than once and then knowing better, purchasing them and still seeing the same results, I stuck to programs like Wealthy Affiliate and learning how to build websites the right way that make me money today.

You saw that formula for making a successful site above and it’s what you can learn to do for yourself with programs like WA.

I won’t say that MICA is a scam with 100% certainty, but I can tell you that I 100% do not trust it because of the reasons I mentioned in this review. If nothing else, the fake testimonials are a giveaway for me.

The post MICA Review. Is Maximum Income Capital Automation a Scam? first appeared on How to Make Honest Money Online.

MICA Review. Is Maximum Income Capital Automation a Scam?

Some of the most questionable make money online opportunities I run into typically carry common warning signs and in MICA’s case, it sadly has all the major ones I would warn people about (I’ll tell you them below).

I found this program today while browsing through an old known scam site that is known to promote these types of programs. In rare instances, these sites will promote a good program. However, in my opinion, MICA is not that rare case. Let’s dive into this review and allow me to explain the issues I see with it (and what I recommend that is truly safer to try).

The quick review of MICA (Maximum Income Capital Automation):

Maximum Income Capital Automation review

Creator: Unknown (it’s a guy with a nice looking beard, but that doesn’t make me trust him).

Price: $97

What is it? So supposedly MICA gives you a fully automated eCommerce website and then drives traffic to that website so it makes money. In other words, by the way they make it sound, all you need to do is buy the program and poof, your site is ready and your money is waiting to come in.

But of course, I will debunk this absurdity in this review because I have had experiences with programs like this.

Overall Rating: 0 out of 10 stars

Recommended? Absolutely not!

This program not only has major red flags, but also leads me to believe that once you buy it, in my opinion, you may likely have to spend more money on traffic, and “business coaches” and I know how that works and what it really is (more money costs to you).

Overall, nothing this program pitched made me trust it.

Alternatives:

mica alternative

3 honest disclaimers about this review of MICA:

1) I didn’t buy this “magic money making” program and that’s because I know better from past (bad) experiences. I’ll highlight some of them in this post.

2) I know the truth about making a truly profitable website (it’s explained below) and I can assure you that, pressing a few buttons, have a website that sells products pop up isn’t enough. In fact, even if they give you traffic to send to that site, that presents it’s own plethora of problems if you don’t understand how traffic works and what sells.

In short, they simplify the process to get you to buy the program, and I assure you, the process is more complicated than that.

3) I strongly suspect they are trying to get you to buy the program so they can then upsell you things like coaching/mentor calls.

In the sales page, they talk about getting a “business coach” when you buy the program but I am 100% certain that the “consultation” you get is really a pitch to buy more. These kinds of programs in my experience are very notorious for that.

A shocking story about a scam program I ran into that is eerily similar to MICA:

About a year ago, I purchased a program called Website ATM. At the time, I knew better and purchased it because I had a 1% ounce of doubt that I could be wrong.

That program’s sales page whipped out all the crazy, inflated promises you see with MICA. Things like:

  • Just buy our program, and get a profitable site instantly.
  • We get you traffic so it’ll make money within 24 hours.
  • You can be making a full time income instantly.
  • Don’t worry about the details, we “handle it for you”.
  • Testimonials from people who said they got results.

And if you compare these promises to MICA, you’ll find nearly identical similarities.

So what happened after I bought it?

  • I discovered I got a truly garbage eCommerce website.
  • I didn’t get any traffic to the site unless I purchased far higher upsells.
  • I believe I was also pitched some garbage coaching offers.
  • In short, I got a website that did nothing and probably wouldn’t even if I fixed it myself.

And Website ATM’s case is not isolated. I’ve tested and bought many work at home scam programs before, and after realizing how often I’m right and shouldn’t let that ounce of doubt let me lose money, I know better now.

And this is the kind of thing I expect from MICA. Here’s 4 reasons why:

1) They literally admit that their testimonials are fake:

Maximum Income Capital Automation fake testimonialsI gotta give the Maximum Income Capital Automation program credit here.

I’ve never seen any program flat out come out and just admit this, and literally right at the start of the sales page of all timings.

Never the less, how can you trust a program who literally buys actors to do their testimonials?

They try to make what I consider an excuse for this saying they protect privacy, but I call nonsense on this because legitimate programs that operate legitimately, will have willing customers give out testimonials because they are happy.

If you take the program I am recommend like Wealthy Affiliate, their success stories and testimonials (see Wealthy Affiliate success stories) which you can see at that link are real.

Hiding identities is not necessary when you’re operating legitimately in my honest opinion, period.

2) Let’s talk about the whole sales pitch and how ridiculous it is.

So again, they pitch this idea that their program has some crazy new system that easily makes people money if they simply buy the program. Like I said before, you get a website with products to sell and they send you traffic so you make money. Sounds amazing right? Well if you have 0 experience with websites and how it really works, maybe.

But in reality, this is such a disingenuous way of selling that it disgusts me. A profitable website is made this way yes, but there are tons of details in the mix of this formula to actually make it work.

This is explained on my homepage here, but also in the way that the alternative, Wealthy Affiliate program teaches you how to do things. And it takes work. It’s not a push button system, sorry, but it is profitable.

3) The never actually explain the system and that’s a red flag.

Again, the selling points of this program are:

  • Buy the program and you’ll make money fast (that’s my personal takeaway).
  • Look at all the fake testimonials that say this works.

4) The whole program title “Maximum Income Capital Automation” is just theater in my opinion.

Again, it’s explained vaguely (but I could understand what’s up because of my experience with this stuff) and they dress up that vagueness up by saying it’s some super titled system (MICA),

Whenever any program doesn’t give you the right details and realistic expectations on how it works, run and MICA does all the things that would make me do that.

how a real website is made

Final Rating: Maximum Income Capital Automation (MICA)

0 stars

Red Flag

0 out of 10 stars. This program does one thing very well and that is: Sells itself on hype alone.

But it doesn’t take a lot of research and questions to make that hype fall apart. I just know how these programs work and how a truly profitable site is truly made so I can quickly find the holes in this system and warn people about it.

My final thoughts:

Since I started doing online marketing, sites like MICA have been around and all of them pretty much say the same things and claim the same things.

But having fallen for them more than once and then knowing better, purchasing them and still seeing the same results, I stuck to programs like Wealthy Affiliate and learning how to build websites the right way that make me money today.

You saw that formula for making a successful site above and it’s what you can learn to do for yourself with programs like WA.

I won’t say that MICA is a scam with 100% certainty, but I can tell you that I 100% do not trust it because of the reasons I mentioned in this review. If nothing else, the fake testimonials are a giveaway for me.

The post MICA Review. Is Maximum Income Capital Automation a Scam? first appeared on How to Make Honest Money Online.

4 Ways to Avoid Owing Payroll Taxes in 2021

If your employer stops withholding Social Security taxes on your paycheck, expect to take home less money in early 2021.

The IRS has released long-awaited direction on the payroll tax cut President Trump ordered in August — just four days before the new rules take effect Sept. 1.

According to the new guidance, employers that don’t withhold payroll taxes between September and December 2020 will be responsible for withholding those taxes during the first four months of 2021.

Translation: If you get a bigger paycheck during the last four months of 2020 due to the temporary payroll tax break, don’t be surprised when you have skimpy paychecks  between January and April of next year, due to more withholding.

“Essentially, the Treasury Department seems to be encouraging employers to stop withholding now through the end of the year, and then double withhold for the first four months of 2021,” wrote Joe Bishop-Henchman, vice president of tax policy and litigation for the National Taxpayers Union, in a blog post on Saturday.

And if you’re no longer working for your employer come January? The guidance says your company can “make arrangements to otherwise collect” the taxes you owe.

No word on how they’d do so if you’re no longer earning a paycheck that they can withhold money from.

Why You’ll Have to Pay Back Your Payroll Tax Cut

Trump issued four relief orders in August, one of which directs the Department of the Treasury to temporarily stop collecting Social Security taxes for people earning less than $104,000 a year. Social Security taxes amount to 6.2% of the first $137,700 of earnings for most employees.

But the payroll tax cut Trump ordered isn’t really a tax cut. Cutting taxes requires changes to the tax law, which Congress must approve.

So without Congress, the only thing the president can do is push back the due date during a year when a disaster is declared. That means that unless lawmakers sign off on a tax cut, you’ll owe the money sooner or later.

Of course, Congress could step in and agree on a compromise that forgives the taxes, possibly in the next stimulus bill. But thus far, both Republicans and Democrats have opposed a payroll tax cut, in part because it doesn’t help the millions of people who are still unemployed.

Plus, it’s likely that Congress would have to step in and provide funding for the tax cut to avoid a Social Security shortfall. Not surprisingly, lawmakers are less than enthused about that prospect.

4 Ways to Avoid a Big Payroll Tax Bill in 2021

There are plenty of payroll tax cut questions that businesses throughout the U.S. are still scrambling to answer. One pressing concern for employers is that they could be on the hook for the employee’s share of payroll taxes if they leave the company for any reason. As a result, many companies aren’t expected to implement withholding changes.

But based on what we know so far, here are some ways to reduce the pain of a smaller paycheck or big tax bill in 2021.

  • Ask your employer if you can opt out.

Since it appears that employers don’t have to stop withholding Social Security, don’t assume this is something you have to worry about.

But if your employer does plan to stop withholding payroll taxes, it’s worth asking if you have the option to continue having the money withheld from your paycheck.

Still, you may not get to choose. Politico reports that the National Finance Center, one of the largest payroll processors for the federal government, has said it will defer the taxes for all eligible employees and doesn’t mention the ability to opt out.

  • Automatically save the extra money.

If your employer does implement the changes, do not spend it. Set up automatic transfers to your bank account each payday for at least the 6.2% that’s no longer being withheld. You can use that money to offset your lower paycheck come January if needed.

Consider setting up an account that’s separate from your regular savings. This is not your emergency fund, so avoid commingling the two.

  • Adjust your withholdings

Another option is to ask your employer to withhold more money from your paycheck by submitting a new W-4. This won’t stop your employer from withholding extra payroll taxes at the beginning of 2021, but it will increase your tax refund. If you file quickly, you can use that money to make up for your temporary pay cut.

  • Assume that you’re paying this back.

Until Congress approves a payroll tax cut, assume you’ll pay back any extra money you receive — most likely in the form of less pay next year.

That means don’t go spending this money. Don’t invest it. Don’t put it toward debt.

The only safe thing to do is to keep this money in a bank account and treat it like money that was never yours to spend.

Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to DearPenny@thepennyhoarder.com.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

This Tracker Tells You Where COVID Outbreaks Are Happening in Schools

It was launched by a teacher who couldn’t find data online.

You can search by state to find a list of confirmed COVID-19 cases at public K-12 schools across the US.

Summer 2020 Wasn’t a Regular Summer for Working Parents, But I’m Sad It’s Ending Anyway

Mita Mallick children

Goodbye to the season I initially dreaded.

Without camp, I worried summer would drag on. Now I’m worried it’s almost gone.
%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar