How to Become a Mortician and Other Jobs in the Funeral Industry

There are a lot of reasons for thinking about becoming a funeral director, the funeral industry’s preferred term for mortician.

For one, the unemployment rate is low. For another, there’s always a need.

And, it is one of the careers that does not require a bachelor’s degree that still pays well. Funeral directors make an average of $55,000 a year. That’s the average and some directors with more experience bring in more than $70,000. As far as school, most states require an associate’s degree, an apprenticeship/internship, and passing a licensing exam.

If working with bereaved families and preparing bodies for burial or cremation seem like something you would be good at, consider this well-paying career path. The funeral industry is estimated to be worth $16 billion in the United States in 2021.

Read on to find out how to become a mortician.

The Difference Between a Mortician and Funeral Director

First, let’s clarify some terms. What are the differences between mortician, funeral director, embalmer and undertaker? They have similar roles but slightly different duties.

In 1895, an American publication called The Embalmer’s Monthly put out a call for a new term for undertakers. The winner was mortician, a made-up word and thank goodness for Morticia Addams, right? Now, the industry uses funeral director for the person arranging the funeral service.

Most funeral directors are licensed morticians and embalmers. They have studied mortuary science and prepare bodies, but they also arrange the other aspects of funeral services. Funeral directors help the bereaved plan the memorial service (and might conduct it if there is no clergy) and arrange for cremation and burial. Funeral directors deal directly with the clients.

An embalmer can work for a funeral home, but also elsewhere — medical schools, hospitals, and morgues. They mainly prepare bodies, and don’t work with clients. The term undertaker is the British term for funeral director and is seldom used in the U.S. except when referring to the popular professional wrestler, The Undertaker.

What Does a Funeral Director Do?

Funeral directors deal with both the living and the dead. Funeral directors arrange for moving the body to the funeral home. They file the paperwork for death certificates, obituaries, and other legal matters.

Preparing a body for the funeral service may or may not include embalming (cremation doesn’t require embalming), but it needs to be dressed, cosseted (put in the best and most natural appearance), and casketed (placed in the coffin).

Funeral services are difficult times for people. The funeral director needs to have compassion for people navigating their pain and sorrow. While an interest in science is necessary, an important quality for someone who wants to become a mortician or funeral director is empathy.

The funeral director guides the grieving through the decisions that have to be made for the funeral service. This not only includes choosing the coffin, but placing the obituary, arranging the wake and service and creating a program for it, shipping remains, and more.

The Changing Funeral Business

Most funeral homes are independently owned. While often smaller businesses don’t have the deeper pockets of corporations, their size allows them to be more nimble in evolving their business. Funeral services have transformed from somber and sorrowful times to celebrations of life with some funeral homes even providing spaces for outdoor gathering complete with grills.

In recent years, more women are graduating in mortuary science. Some people might become funeral service workers as a second career instead of inheriting the business, which has been a traditional entry into the industry. The National Funeral Directors Association encourages its members to seek out, hire, and train more women and non-binary people.

You can find mortuary science stars on social media, including the popular YouTube channel, Ask a Mortician. There are funeral directors’ TikTok videos, and mortician AMAs (ask me anything) on Reddit.

Get Started in the Funeral Business

Most states require a two-year associate’s degree in mortuary science or related areas, an apprenticeship or internship, and passing the national or state’s license exam. Ohio and Minnesota are the only two states that require a bachelor’s degree to be a funeral home director. Colorado does not have any education requirements, but licenses funeral homes instead. Kentucky doesn’t license funeral directors but does license embalmers.

The National Funeral Directors Association is your go-to source for state-by-state details of working in the funeral industry.

If you were also thinking about joining the military, the Navy is the only service branch with its own morticians. For that you need a high school diploma or GED, and then you would get training through the Navy as a hospital corpsman-mortician.

Licensure

You usually have to be at least 21 years old to take the exams, though you can start an internship or apprenticeship before that age. There may also be a criminal background check. Having a criminal record doesn’t mean you can’t become a mortician. You also have to submit proof of U.S. citizenship or permanent residency.

You can also study for and take the national funeral service education board exam. The pathways to these two types of exams can be different. It is important to note that not all mortuary science programs are accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE).

You can only take the National Board Exam if you have a degree from an accredited program. Some states allow you to take the state exam even if your program is not accredited. The exams are the same. It is just more difficult to practice in a different state if you haven’t attended an accredited program.

State Licenses

Most states have information about how to become a mortician through their occupational license, public health, or funeral board sections on their website. It is important that you clarify whether the mortuary science programs are accredited for just the state license exam, or for both state and national exams. Some schools also offer Funeral Arts Certificates, which can be used for other jobs in the funeral service industry.

National License

The American Board of Funeral Service Education is the national academic accreditation agency for college and university programs in Funeral Service and Mortuary Science Education. Most states have easier reciprocity requirements to transfer your practice if you have taken the national board exam. If you have taken the state exam only, you may have to meet all of the requirements again if you move to another state.

Classwork for the License

Coursework can be broken down into roughly three categories: art, business, and science. Art? That is for the restorative arts, or visually preparing the body for a funeral service, which includes hair and makeup. There are courses which cover death traditions from many cultures and the history of funerals.

Science classes may cover embalming theory and labs, anatomy, physiology, public health, and pathology. There are chemistry and biology courses, and also usually psychology courses on grief and bereavement training.

Business classes will cover funeral home administration, accounting, requirements for a funeral service license, and some business law. There are usually classes covering legal and ethical issues that a certified funeral service practitioner will face.

Cost of Getting a License

The cost of getting a two-year mortuary science degree varies by state but your best bet will be an in-state community college. Then there will be costs associated with taking exams and getting a license.

School

There is a huge difference in how much you can pay for a mortuary science associate’s degree. In-state public schools may cost between $5,000-$8,500. Private, out of state tuition might be almost $20,000. There are the normal student loans and grants available, but there are also specific grants for students studying mortuary science (even as a second career). It seems like a great investment, since unemployment for funeral directors is extremely low.

Exam

The National Board Exam has two sections, arts and sciences. Each one costs $285. There are practice exams that you can take, which are free. In Florida, the state funeral service examining boards charge $132 for exams. Maine charges $75 plus $21 for a criminal background check. Texas charges $89. Some states have two separate exams — one for funeral services and the other for embalming.

Licenses

This is another area with variation. Using the same three states as above, Florida’s license for a funeral director costs $430 with all the fees. Maine’s is $230, and Texas costs $175 plus $93 for the application. Apparently not everything is bigger in Texas! Licenses need to be renewed periodically, which also requires continuing education credits.

Want to break into the medical field? Consider one of these entry level medical jobs that can bring in $40,000 a year.

Funeral Director as Entrepreneur

The funeral industry has been changing rapidly over the last few years. Cremations have increased and burials decreased. Funeral homes make less money on cremations, and have responded to this shift by finding new sources of income and new ways to help people.

Green Funerals

There are more environmentally conscious choices that funeral homes can offer, including rental coffins for services (and a plain one after), biodegradable coffins, and natural burials. Green funeral services include sourcing flowers locally, using funeral invitations and programs made of recycled paper embedded with seeds, and biodegradable water urns, which sink and dissipate for at sea services..

Pet Funerals

An estimated 67% of households in the U.S. own pets, and many of them are using funeral home services for their animals. That includes memorials, services, and burials. Despite pet cremation being infinitely (well, 90 vs.10%) more popular than burial, there are over 200 pet cemeteries in the U.S., with Florida having the most.

Other Jobs in the Funeral Industry

Besides being an intern or apprentice, you can work in the funeral industry in many other ways. Florida lists 16 separate individual and business licenses for funeral home-related activities.

Here are the common jobs in the funeral or mortician industry though keep in mind in a smaller business, the funeral director may do some of them:

  • Administrative assistants handle office work.
  • Burial rights brokers arrange for third parties to sell or transfer burial rights.
  • Cemeterians maintain cemetery grounds (think groundskeeper).
  • Ceremonialists conduct the funeral service.
  • Crematory operators/technicians assist in cremation remains.
  • Direct disposers handle cremation when there is no service or embalming.
  • Embalmers prepare the body after death.
  • Funeral arrangers work with clients to set up the funeral.
  • Funeral home manager is the best paying job in the field, the median salary for this position is more than $74,000. The manager oversees all funeral home operations.
  • Funeral service managers are similar to funeral arrangers.
  • Funeral supply sales personnel work for the funeral home-sourcing supplies.
  • Monument agents sell tombstones and other markers for the cemetery.
  • Mortuary transport drivers prepare and transport human remains.
  • Pathology technicians work in hospitals, morgues, or universities with cadavers.
  • Pre-need sales agents help clients plan their services and burials before they die.
Check out these in-demand services that could make you up to $60/hour as a virtual assistant. College degree not required.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Funeral Business Jobs

We’ve rounded up the answers to the most common questions about working in the funeral industry.

What Jobs Can You Do at a Funeral Home?
negotiate supplies, transport bodies, conduct funeral services, and work with clients to place obituaries and arrange the service. They also have sales people working on pre-need arrangements. Some funeral homes feature pet burials and have special jobs related to that.
How Much Do You Make Working at a Funeral Home?
Funeral directors average $55,000 annually. Managing a funeral home pays a median salary of $74,000. Mortuary transport drivers average over $35,000. It is a field with very low unemployment.
How Do I Get a Job in the Funeral Industry?
Most states require two years of school, a (paid) internship, and passing the appropriate license exams to become a funeral director. Other jobs may require less.The mortuary transport driver has to be able to lift 100 pounds or more and have a clean driving record.
What is a Funeral Home Job Called?
There are many. There are funeral directors, embalmers, mortuary transport drivers, and funeral service arrangers. There are also typical office jobs, such as administrative assistant and bookkeepers. There are also related jobs at crematoriums, hospitals, and mortuaries.

The Penny Hoarder contributor JoEllen Schilke writes on lifestyle and culture topics. She is the former owner of a coffee shop in St.Petersburg, Florida, and has hosted an arts show on WMNF community radio for nearly 30 years.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

How I Define ‘Having It All’ as a Working Mom—And How You Can Too

We all have license to change our definition.

Google is wrong—here’s what it really means to “have it all,” according to this author mom.

Comparing ZipRecruiter vs. Glassdoor for Employers

With millions of unfilled job openings and a serious shortage of workers, businesses across the country are struggling to recruit the employees they need.

Is your business struggling to find qualified job candidates? In that case, you’ve no doubt considered using a popular online recruitment platform like ZipRecruiter or Glassdoor. But what’s the difference between the two? Which one is best for your needs?

In this guide, we’ll go in-depth and do a side-by-side comparison between these two platforms — how they work, what they cost and what audiences they’re aimed at.

Let’s start with an overview of each:

ZipRecruiter: Post a Job on Multiple Job Boards

ZipRecruiter is useful if you need a job opening to be posted widely so you can hire someone quickly. ZipRecruiter isn’t a job board itself. Instead, it’s a marketplace that allows employers to post a job opening to multiple online job boards at the same time.

ZipRecruiter uses artificial intelligence to decide where to post your job vacancies, and it uses its matching technology to analyze millions of data points to find the best potential matches for your job.

ZipRecruiter for Employers

It’s free for employers to try for four days. After that, there are various packages you can buy, depending on your needs. ZipRecruiter offers three different monthly plans, based on how many jobs you want to advertise.

You can pay extra for sponsored posts to give your job postings premium placement on job sites. There’s also a “traffic boost” option that allows you to send out job postings via email, attracting more applicants. You can also sort through resumes on your ZipRecruiter dashboard.

Once you post jobs, ZipRecruiter’s AI can promote your listings and send job alerts to candidates who are more likely to be interested and qualified. The AI tools can also help you right-size your recruitment efforts to keep your spending efficient and on budget.

The platform can also help you keep track of applicants, and it’ll help you integrate your current applicant tracking system into its platform.

ZipRecruiter for Job Seekers

If you’re on a job search, the site is free for job seekers. You can search for job posts based on factors like desired salary, location or various keywords.

You can post a profile on the site that potential employers can see. You can post your resume, references, social network handles or a profile picture, among other things.

Glassdoor: Employees Rate Employers

Glassdoor launched in 2008 as a company ratings site where employees and former employees could review the companies they worked for, and post their salaries for comparison. It has since expanded its offerings, and now attracts roughly 50 million visitors per month.

Glassdoor for Employers

You can claim your company on Glassdoor’s website and create a company profile for free. It’s a good way to build your brand. The free version allows you to post basic information about your company and what it does. Glassdoor’s paid plans offer more customization options.

For job listings, Glassdoor sends you to its sister website, Indeed.com, one of the biggest online job boards around for employers and job hunters alike. You can post up to 10 jobs free for seven days. Beyond that, though, you’ll need to pay.

Indeed’s hiring platform helps employers tap into that job board to find qualified candidates who are available. Recruiters can expedite the screening process, automatically moving candidates forward who indicate they meet preset conditions in hiring questionnaires.

Like ZipRecruiter, Indeed lets you pay to bump up the placement of your job posting in search results, and you can create targeted ads to advertise to more qualified candidates.

Glassdoor for Job Seekers

Glassdoor is free for job seekers, and the company profiles are useful in your job search. You can also read employees’ and former employees’ unvarnished reviews of each company, and guess what? Not all the reviews are positive! In fact, some of the reviews tend to be scathing. Reading them can be quite educational.

Two people work in an office cubicle.

ZipRecruiter vs. Glassdoor: Pros and Cons

Each of these popular recruitment platforms have their pluses and minuses, depending on what you’re looking for:

ZipRecruiter’s Pros and Cons

Pros Cons
Artificial intelligence helps you scale your recruiting efforts Free trial only lasts four days
Can reach more than 100 job boards No ability to post a company page
Has customizable job description templates for employers to use Can be more expensive than other options

Glassdoor’s Pros and Cons

Pros Cons
Offers some basic job listings for free The actual job listings are on a different site, Indeed
You can create a company profile with information you want prospective recruits to see Prices aren’t posted online

ZipRecruiter vs. Glassdoor: Applicant Tracking

Does your company use an applicant tracking system like Bullhorn, ClearCompany or Greenhouse? Both ZipRecruiter and Glassdoor work seamlessly with dozens of third-party applicant tracking systems.

Using ATS integration, these online platforms can help ensure that your job posts are up-to-date, eliminating friction for job seekers and making the interview process more efficient.

Both ZipRecruiter and Glassdoor’s ATS integration can also generate valuable data for employers, from monitoring job posting quality to helping you tap into a resume database. The analytics can show you how well candidates respond to your job alerts or job ads and help you uncover ways to improve them.

ZipRecruiter vs. Glassdoor: What It Costs

This is the most challenging part for job posters like you to grapple with, because there are so many different pricing options, and not all the prices are posted online. In some cases, you’ll need to ask each company’s sales department for a quote.

Free options are few. Both recruiting platforms offer free trials: ZipRecruiter lets you post jobs for free for four days. Glassdoor lets you post up to 10 job openings for free for seven days.

ZipRecruiter’s Pricing

ZipRecruiter has three monthly plans — Standard, Premium and Pro. Prices are based on how many jobs you need to post and how many job boards or job sites you want your job opportunities to be posted on. Prices start as low as $16 per day for one reusable job post.

“First we work with you to understand your specific hiring goals, strategy and budget,” ZipRecruiter says on its website. “From there, we customize your campaign based on the number of jobs you have, the type of jobs you need to fill, the location, and industry. Plans can be tailored for a monthly subscription or pay-for-performance depending on your hiring goals.”

Glassdoor’s Pricing

Through Glassdoor, you can post up to 10 jobs for free for seven days on its sister site, Indeed. Beyond that, though, you’ll need to pay for premium job placements.

Glassdoor has two paid plans — Standard and Select. For prices, you have to contact Glassdoor’s sales department.

With the Standard package, you can customize your company profile and do a keyword analysis of your company’s reviews, among other things. With the Select package, you get industry benchmark reports and audience targeting insights.

ZipRecruiter vs. Glassdoor: Customer Support

With ZipRecruiter, you can reach customer service via the phone, live chat or email. The website also has a thorough FAQ as well as “how to” guides.

Glassdoor has a “Contact Us” page on its website where you can send the company queries. There’s also a search bar that can help you find answers to your questions.

Resume Search

Want to do a resume search? ZipRecruiter has a vast resume database and provides unlimited resume searches for clients who purchase one of its premium plans. If you’ve purchased the cheapest plan, you’ll have to buy resume searches.

Glassdoor’s sister site, Indeed, also offers screening solutions to expedite the hiring process, without letting an unqualified candidate smooth-talk you into an interview.

The Bottom Line

If you’re an employer looking for an effective place to post a job, these are two solid options.

Glassdoor allows you to create a detailed company profile and assert some control over your brand. It also allows you to post jobs through its sister site, Indeed.

However, ZipRecruiter offers you the ability to get your job posting out to more than 100 job sites. Also, hiring managers and HR directors can take advantage of how ZipRecruiter’s AI streamlines the process of creating job postings, reaching qualified talent and tracking candidates.

Either choice can find you the employees you need.

Mike Brassfield (mike@thepennyhoarder.com) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Comparing Indeed vs Craigslist for Employers

Do you need to fill a job opening? Are you looking to hire a qualified applicant with a minimum of hassles?

In that case, you’ve no doubt considered using a popular jobs board like Indeed or Craigslist. But what’s the difference between the two? Which one would be best for what you need?

A third website that competes with them is ZipRecruiter, which can post a job opening to up to 100 job boards at the same time. If neither Indeed nor Craigslist has exactly what you need, ZipRecruiter might be a better choice to find qualified candidates for your job vacancy.

As for Indeed and Craigslist, there are key differences between them. In this guide, we’ll do a side-by-side comparison between these two platforms — how they work, what they cost and what kind of job seekers they’re aimed at.

What Is Indeed?

Launched in 2004, Indeed is a free job board that also offers paid, premium options to make life easier for job seekers and employers alike.

Because it’s free, employers gain access to a diverse candidate pool that’s brimming with talent. And job seekers don’t have to pay to apply for jobs, upload their resume to Indeed’s database, or create job alerts for roles they’re interested in.

For employers, the free features of Indeed take the risk out of testing the waters of the talent pool. But its premium features, such as sponsored postings and a subscription to Indeed’s resume database, are what really make Indeed useful for employers.

Other top features of Indeed’s job board include company pages, support for third-party applicant-tracking systems and Instant Match, a tool that matches candidate resumes to your job ads.

What is Craigslist?

Founded in 1995, Craigslist is best known for being a classified-ads marketplace where people can find nearly anything — furniture, rooms to rent, missed connections and even legal help.

But a major portion of Craigslist’s business is as one of the top job search sites where job seekers can find part-time work, manual labor, side gigs and more.

How Indeed Works for Employers

Employers can post a basic job opening for free on Indeed, making it an ideal platform for hiring managers who are operating on a budget. But as great as the free option is, that also means the competition is stiff to get your job postings seen. How many other employers are competing for the eyes of qualified candidates?

Indeed’s solution to that problem is a paid job post. For as little as a few bucks a day, employers can post sponsored jobs and make sure the job postings get in front of the most applicants who are job searching. When you pay for a post, you can invite people to apply for your job after finding resume matches.

Other free solutions for employers include adding screener questions and the ability to message and virtually interview candidates. It’s not possible to repost jobs from other websites onto Indeed.

Indeed also simplifies the screening process by grouping qualified applicants to the top of a dashboard, automatically declining applicants and helping to schedule interviews all within their website.

How Craigslist Works for Employers

Craigslist Jobs is a cost-effective solution for employers looking to fill jobs. There are no subscriptions required, just a flat fee for each job posting. You don’t even need to create an account to post jobs if you don’t want to.

Craigslist job postings are strictly a no-frills experience, though. You go without flashy features like resume searches or the ability to manage applicants. Job listings won’t be syndicated to 100 other job boards like with ZipRecruiter, either. But if a hiring manager knows exactly what they’re looking for, they can upload new job openings to the Craigslist job boards in a matter of minutes.

Employers looking to hire via Craigslist job postings can get an unlimited number of emails from potential candidates. On the downside, you won’t be able to search through any sort of resume database to find qualified local candidates.

Indeed vs. Craigslist: What They Cost

Indeed starts out free. There’s no charge for posting a help-wanted ad on the site.

If you want to post jobs and attract more eyeballs to your job posting, though, it costs. Indeed has a pay-per-click model where pricing is based on user engagement with job posts. The total cost is based on the budget you set and the amount of time you choose to advertise the job.

Also, 30 resume views per month costs $100, while 100 resume views per month costs $250.

As for Craigslist, it’s by far the cheapest option for employers looking to speed up their hiring process. A 30-day job posting costs between $10 and $75, depending on the location. Individual listings can’t be swapped out for new ones — instead, employers will need to create a new posting, but they can post as many jobs as they want at any given time. All you need to do is pay with your credit card for a new listing.

Indeed vs. Craigslist: the Bottom Line

When it comes to comparing job boards, it’s important to know what you’re looking for before you make a decision on where to start.

A Craigslist job search is no-frills. Applying to a Craigslist job is similar to how people acquire things from other Craigslist posts — job searching users need to email or call the poster and hope to hear back from them. There isn’t a way to track applications or answer screening questions to make yourself stand out.

Side gigs, part-time and manual labor tend to have more options in a Craigslist job search, while job boards like Indeed or ZipRecruiter are better known for full-time positions.

If you’re a job seeker starting a job search, think about what kind of job you’re looking for. Are you looking for a side gig, or something that doesn’t require a university degree? Craigslist can be a good solution for you to land a job quickly.

Employers on a small budget will also benefit from Craigslist’s affordable job board. For as little as $10 each, you can post as many jobs as they want — but you’ll have to do a lot more leg work when it comes to sorting through unqualified applicants and manually handling the entire hiring process.

Now, with the ability to simply syndicate job postings, create sponsored jobs, boost team collaboration and take advantage of the job site’s artificial intelligence, there’s a reason why ZipRecruiter has been named the No. 1 website for employers’ hiring needs. It has a nearly perfect rating on TrustPilot, taking it to the top spot above all the other job boards.

As for people who are job searching and hoping to get plenty of resume views on their job search, ZipRecruiter has thousands of potential employers and millions of jobs to search through. And with the recruiting process made simple for a potential employer, it then makes it easier for job seekers to make it through the job search process.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Glassdoor vs. Indeed: 2021 Comparison

There are so many job boards out there in the world — some being a better choice than others, depending on your needs. So let’s compare two of the top job search engines out there — Glassdoor vs. Indeed — to help you make a decision on which one you should be using, whether as a job seeker or an employer looking to post job listings.

Glassdoor and Indeed are owned by the same holding company, but they operate as separate entities. They both function as a way to improve recruiting and hiring, but they can serve different purposes. Many companies find success using both websites to complement their recruiting efforts.

Another website that addresses many of the options on both sides, in one location, is ZipRecruiter. If neither Indeed nor Glassdoor has everything job seekers or employers need, it may be a better choice to find qualified candidates or land your next role. Read on to understand which job board will help you achieve your professional goals.

What is Glassdoor?

Glassdoor goes beyond the typical job board and features employer branding solutions for companies in the hiring process and gives job seekers the ability to research companies before applying to the jobs posted. In addition to seeing job postings, job seekers can read more about potential companies, including their benefits and salary information. Employers can post photos of the office and from events, too, to give potential candidates a better understanding of what the company culture is like.

A particularly unique feature of Glassdoor is that current and former employees (as well as people who have only interviewed with them) can leave employee reviews for other candidates to see. Pros, cons, feedback on the interview process and what can be done to improve all help job seekers get a more in depth look into the company.

As for size, there are 50 million unique monthly users on Glassdoor, nearly 20 million less than Indeed.

What is Indeed?

Indeed is the largest job-searching website in the world — there are tens of millions of employers posting jobs and hundreds of millions of applicants hoping to find their next role. It’s main and only focus is as a job-search engine.

There are more than 70 million monthly users coming to Indeed to search for their next role, twice what Glassdoor has. With such a large audience, it’s a great option for employers to upload free job postings and for applicants to find plenty of job openings.

How Does Glassdoor Work for Employers?

When looking to hire for more niche roles, Glassdoor is a great solution for employers looking to showcase their business and company culture. The ability to create a brand that job seekers are interested in can be a huge advantage during the recruiting process.

Companies can create a brand page for free, as well as utilize the insights that Glassdoor provides to improve employee and interviewee experiences.

With a paid membership, hiring managers can use premium features on Glassdoor like competitor comparisons, branded advertising to get in front of more qualified candidates, and review analysis.

Because Glassdoor’s main focus isn’t the job search, but instead a branding site for companies, there aren’t as many features for recruiters to utilize as there are on a job site like Indeed or ZipRecruiter. There’s no applicant tracking system, nor can employers conduct a resume search.

How Does Indeed Work for Employers?

Employers can post a basic job opening for free on Indeed, making it an ideal platform for hiring managers working on a budget. But as great as the free option is, that also means the competition is stiff to get your job posting seen. How many other employers are competing for the eyes of qualified candidates?

Indeed’s solution to that problem is a paid job post. For as little as a few bucks a day, employers can post sponsored jobs and make sure the job postings get in front of the most applicants. When you pay for a post, you can invite people to apply for your job after finding resume matches.

Other free solutions for employers include adding screener questions and the ability to message and virtually interview candidates. It’s not possible to repost jobs from other websites onto Indeed.

Indeed also simplifies the screening process by grouping qualified applicants to the top of a dashboard, automatically declining applicants and helping to schedule interviews all within their website.

The Differences and Similarities for a Job Seeker: Glassdoor vs. Indeed

For job seekers, Glassdoor is a window into what it will be like to work for a company. When perusing the job board, they’ll be able to see not only the job postings, but an estimated salary range, company description and company reviews plus the benefits that are offered.

The uniquely detailed insight into an employer brand isn’t a feature that exists on Indeed, but if using both Glassdoor and Indeed together, candidates can pop back and forth between the two websites to get the information they need before applying on either website.

Another difference is the amount of available jobs and competition from other job seekers. Glassdoor jobs tend to be more niche, but there are  about 20 million less users searching for jobs on the site each month as there are on Indeed. On the flip side, Indeed can be overwhelming with the amount of available jobs to search through.

Glassdoor’s job board requires an account for all job seekers to be able to view jobs, salaries and reviews from previous and current employees — but it’s free to use.

Indeed is free for every job seeker and doesn’t necessarily require an account to search for job postings  and apply for jobs. Job seekers can create an account to post their resume and make it easier for recruiters to contact them, but it’s not necessary.

The job search engines on both sites let job seekers filter their search results by job title or keyword and location. Plus, they can get email job alerts when a job posting that matches their search is added to the website.

Can’t Decide Between Glassdoor vs. Indeed? Try ZipRecruiter

If you’re comparing Indeed vs. Glassdoor to decide which job board to use, a third option is ZipRecruiter. It’s a more streamlined way to post jobs and recruit top talent without being behind an account wall — or having to flip between two different sites — and it also happens to be the No. 1 job search engine online.

ZipRecruiter has a free trial for companies (it’s always free for people looking for new opportunities), then prices start as low as $16 per day for one reusable job post. The features that come with the cost make it worthwhile, if you’re serious about filling your positions quickly.

Each job posting can be syndicated to more than 100 other job boards, multiplying the number of qualified job seekers that will see your listing. Employers can also conduct a resume search and see potential candidates’ employment history before inviting them to apply to a specific position instead of waiting for future employees to find them.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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